pastoral

now browsing by tag

 
 

My Empire vs. God’s Kingdom

Youth Ministry TerritoryI have done youth ministry for well over a decade and I am always amazed at territorialism in the church.  Like Paul, I feel like there have been times where I am “chief among sinners” in this regard.  I am guilty of building my empire and not God’s Kingdom.

Some of us have served on staff at churches where the issue of territory was prevalent.  Conversations like, “well you can’t use resource X because resource X belongs to the _________ ministry team and they don’t like people touching their stuff.”  Or perhaps your church is short on space for storage, and a few ministry teams insist on keeping many things in closets that will likely never see the light of day.  “But what if we need that VHS curriculum for an adult small group?” or, “Could we  use those cassette tapes for children’s choir?”  Perhaps you’re the perpetrator, and have said “I just can’t part with _______ because I might need it for a crazy rec game at camp in 2035.”  In one way or another, we all try to protect our territory and the resources that belong to our ministry department.  There comes a point however, when this is unhealthy.  Territorialism is NOT Christian stewardship.

Donna Flagg, founder of The Krysalis Group identifies territorial tendencies as “turfism.”  In a post for Psychology Today, she states that “turfism erects walls, commonly known to produce what has been coined in workplace jargon as a “silo effect,” which ultimately limits communication, hinders the development of relationships and infects the culture with an overall lack of cooperation among people and departments.”  Protecting territory and erecting walls between others on your ministry team is NOT a healthy way to manage resources.

In Acts 4, Luke points out that all the believers shared everything they had because ”No on claimed that any of their possessions where their own” (Acts 4:32, NIV).  This worked in the early church, and it works today.  We need to understand that the resources that we are blessed with are not our own.  We are all on the same team,  We all have the same goal of reaching people with God’s love.

We should build God’s Kingdom, not our own empires.  The Gallup Business Journal identifies “empire building” as the ”pinnacle and most extreme level of pyramid bureaucracy.”  Read the full article here.  When we build our own empires through turfism, the Kingdom of God becomes secondary.  So how are these pitfalls avoided?  Three ways to avoid personal empire building in your own ministry are:

  1. Try to see the big picture.  We we view things narrowly and from our perspective alone, we are on the road to empire building.  Take other views into consideration and maintain a flexible spirit.
  2. Admit that everything belongs to God.  Realize that the resources you have are not yours, or your departments, or even your church’s.  They belong to God.
  3. Let go of your fear to fail.  Too often, we fear our own failure and so we grasp for power.  This may include trying to Turfismtake over or “help” in multiple ministry areas, or even an unwillingness to share a storage closet.  God is the one who called you to ministry, so let go of your need to impress others and find true joy in serving the Lord.

Contrary to the Jay-Z song, Christians are NOT called to have an “Empire State Of Mind,” but a Kingdom of God state of mind.  Let’s get busy building God’s Kingdom instead of our own.

Spiritual Renewal For Ministers

Spiritual Renewal For MinistersI would like to propose that ministers are the most effective when they are spiritually renewed and refreshed.  Anyone disagree with that premise?  Didn’t think so.  The question then is what practices bring spiritual renewal to those in ministerial leadership?  Providing care for others is imperative in ministry but unless we care for ourselves, both spiritually and physically, the well from which we draw on to offer care grows dry.  Methodist minister and educator Edward P. Wimberly’s book “Recalling Our Own Stories-Spiritual Renewal for Religious Caregivers,” gives three big ideas on spiritual renewal for ministers.  To Wimberly, spiritual renewal is not an emotional high at a retreat weekend, or a renewed committment to personal holiness, or a fresh commitment to read the Bible more often (although each of these certainly brings renewal in their own way).  The renewal Wimberly speaks of is much deeper and cuts to the core of the psychological self.  Here are the ways Wimberly says we can find spiritual renewal as ministers. 

  1. Remember Your Call:  God calls men and women every day to ministry of various types.  Student ministers, deacons and elders, Sunday-school teachers, and even occasional volunteers should be able to name how they felt called to the ministry they do.  When did God call you to ministry?  How did you hear God’s voice?  What were your original motivations for getting into ministry?  These are all questions Wimberly suggests we ask ourselves in seeking spiritual renewal.  Remembering and reflecting on why we got into ministry in the first place is spiritually renewing because it takes us back to a place where God lit a passion in our hearts to serve.  Have you ever attempted to identify your call story with the call story of someone in scripture?  Moses had no sense of personal identity until he met God on a mountainside.  Paul had the wrong sense of call until blinded by God’s light in an earth-shattering encounter.  Samuel didn’t recognize God’s voice until a mentor helped him identify it.  Esther had no sense of her unique gifts until a relative told her how she could serve God’s people.  The list goes on of characters in scripture who God called in unique ways.  Feeling burnt out?  Frustrated with a situation in your ministry context?  Take some time to reflect on God’s call in your life.  Remember how you felt when God called you initially.  Be renewed through allowing God to affirm your call again each day.  A high sense of call is vital to spiritual health for ministers.
  2. Explore Your Life Story:  We all have a unique story that contributes to how we care for others.  What’s your story?  Pastors, youth ministers, camp counselors, and other types of ministers are given countless opportunities to provide pastoral care for those in the flock.  It becomes important over time to periodically reflect on our ways of providing care, and acknowledge our own weaknesses and strengths in care giving.  We are unable to effectively care for others without a strong sense of where we’ve come from and who we are.  Consider your family story.  Are there overarching narratives in your life that contribute to how you relate to others?  Do you always act like a victim at church because you have always been the victim in your family?  Do you feel obligated to please everyone all the time?  Perhaps you had to play the peacemaker among siblings growing up and it is now rubbing off on how you deal with the parents of your youth group.  Identifying our stories and the themes they contain is crucial to renewal both personally and spiritually.  According to Wimberly, some common issues ministers deal with include perfectionism, workaholism, feeling a deep need not to repeat the mistakes of a past generation, too much self-sufficiency, and the need to control everything.  Do any of these speak to you?  Exploring our own stories helps us identify our weaknesses so that we can begin working on them.
  3. Be Accountable To Others:  I recently learned that a colleague of mine had a father who was in ministry.  The man would meet once a monthRecalling Our Own Stories with other ministers in the area for accountability.  The conversation wasn’t anything you normally hear at a minister’s shindig.  No one discussed how many butts were in seats last Sunday, how the weather was, or even how the local sports team was doing.  The collegiality that these pastors had was MUCH deeper than these superficial topics.  According to my colleague, “When they gathered, they focused on two things: (1) what are you celebrating (i.e. what’s going well)? and (2) what are you up against (what challenges are you facing)?”  We should all find a small group or even a single friend that we can make ourselves vulnerable to.  It is rare that I share my weaknesses with anyone in ministry, whether they are at my local church or not.  This may be a personal flaw, but I believe that most of us are guilty of trying to be lone-rangers when it comes to our own spiritual health.  Who is holding you accountable to live out your call?  Who is holding you accountable to working on personal weaknesses and character flaws? 

What would spiritual renewal look like in your life?  In your ministry?  In your community?  Ministry is about bringing restoration to a broken world desperately in need of God’s love.  Evangelism is about the restoration of sinful humanity to a right relationship with a forgiving God.  Social-justice ministry is about the restoration of God’s justice and reign in our present time.  Worship on Sundays is about restoring our view of God’s honor and glory and rightly giving thanks for all God has done.  Ministry is restorative to souls, to families, to entire cities.  There is a caveat though.  Ministers cannot effectively bring renewal to others and be the ”salt of the earth“ without first being renewed themselves by God’s grace and love.  Remember how God called you to ministry.  Explore your own story and learn from it.  Make yourself vulnerable and accountable to other ministry professionals. In doing these things, I pray God gives you a fresh sense of spiritual renewal.   

 

 

Five Do’s and Don’ts for Ministry With Grieving Teens

grieving familyGrief can be hard to comprehend for anyone. This is especially true for adolescents. There is a very good chance that an adolescent experiencing grief due to loss or tragedy is experiencing true grief for the first time in their life. Grief is most often an emotional response that comes from some deep personal loss. For a teenager, grief may arise due to the divorce of parents, the loss of a friend, or the death of a grandparent, parent or sibling. The most common cause of grief is the death of a loved one or friend, which most adolescents have yet to experience. Grief can be a scary, overwhelming experience that leaves people struggling with feelings of anger, guilt, helplessness, fear and anxiety, loneliness and abandonment, depression, and even relief.[i] Grief is not just feeling blue, but rather a roller-coaster of emotions that takes months to process. Here are a few tips for providing pastoral care for teenagers and their families when a death has occurred.

Five Do’s

  1. Do provide loving presence. Mark Twain once wrote “I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”[ii] Avoiding a teen or family in mourning because of our own insecurities is a challenge for many ministers to overcome. Grieving people need the support of caring individuals who simply provide a listening ear and a shoulder to cry on. Everyone is uncomfortable when tragic loss strikes a family but as pastoral care providers, ministers and lay leaders should comfort the family rather than avoid them. It is important to realize that “acknowledgement of their loss is what they need.”[iii] A hug, a hand on a shoulder, sitting together in silence, praying, listening, crying together and remembering happy memories of the deceased are all ways of providing presence. Remember, in a pastoral sense, you are the comforting presence of God to a grieving person. Words and cliché’s are not adequate or helpful, but your calm assuring presence is.
  2. Do help provide hospitable care for the teen and her/his family. Providing care goes beyond simply providing presence. Have other youth make a giant card with encouraging scripture written on it. If someone from the church hasn’t made a sign-up sheet for providing meals for the family, make one. Remember to only take as much food as the family will need. Sometimes it works best to bring by food every other day instead of every day. The church may be providing food, but the coworkers of parents may as well.
  3. Do assist with the funeral and visitation. If you are a senior pastor this job likely falls on your shoulders. Families experiencing grief often need guidance in making plans for burial, especially if the loss was unexpected. Funeral homes might try and up-sell the family a bunch of things they don’t actually need. Questions a family needs to think through may include: Did the deceased have a life insurance policy and if not, where will the money come from for the funeral and burial? (Some families may need assistance from your church’s deacon’s or bereavement fund.) Are they going to bury or cremate? If burial is their choice do they have a plot? Will the coffin be open or closed before the service? Do they want to have a private funeral for the family only, and a memorial service open to the public at a later date? They may want to pick songs or scriptures that had special meaning to the deceased. Funeral directors will help guide the family through many of these decisions, but a pastor’s presence and gentle advice can save a family thousands of dollars in unnecessary expenses. It’s not really the youth minister’s place to help guide a family through these decisions, but youth ministers can help in axillary roles such as: being an extra pastoral presence at the visitation and funeral service, providing transportation to teens that may be getting out of school early for the funeral, helping transport the elderly to the graveside service, picking up a floral arrangement from the church and delivering it to the funeral home, printing bulletins for the funeral service, or pushing out information about visitation and funeral times on the church’s social media accounts.
  4. Do come up with an extended plan for care. Grief is a process that takes considerable time to deal with. Make plans for follow-up contact with the teenager and her/his family in the days and weeks after a funeral. A house can get awfully quiet and even lonely after extended family has all gone home, meals are no longer being delivered to the house, and everyone else has gone back to routine and normalcy. The week after the funeral, plan on dropping by the family’s house and visiting for about thirty minutes. Let the family know that you are praying for them. Send encouraging texts to teenagers, perhaps with a scripture to remind them that God is grieving with them and loves them deeply. On the first day the student goes back to school send them an encouraging text at the beginning of the day. Be mindful of the one year anniversary, and set a reminder on your calendar to send a card. The teenager and family will likely need counseling to deal with the grief process. Make appointments with them as necessary.
  5. Do help other teenagers in your group process the death. Other teens in your group are likely to have known the deceased, especially if it was a parent, a friend’s sibling or one of their peers from school that died. They are likely to need help processing the situation and may be grieving themselves. Take time at youth group meetings or in the hall on Sunday mornings to speak with teens that are processing the death. Teens may be very disturbed by death because they have never considered the fact that they too will die one day. They might want to spend more time with members of their own family because they have never fully appreciated the frailty of life. Teenagers will also need help in knowing how to comfort their peer. They’ll have no idea what to say or do, but they’ll be willing love on their friend. It’s the responsibility of a youth minister in this situation to teach students in the group appropriate ways of providing comfort and care to the bereaved. The same principles that apply to ministers are appropriate for youth to consider as well: that presence is more important that having the right words to say, that care is more important than avoidance for personal comfort, and that the body of Christ goes into action when a family in the church needs loving care. The students of your church are future elders and deacons, assuming this whole discipling things works. Take the opportunity to teach them how to care for others in the church who need their support.

Five Don’ts

  1. Don’t use clichés or filler phrases. Just because you don’t know what to say in the event of tragic loss doesn’t mean you have to say something stupid. Many times when we are uncomfortable with a situation we may be tempted to use filler phrases that do little to help the grieving individual. Avoid saying things like:
    • “Well I guess God just needed another angel.” (Then God could have made a new angel without taking a loved one away. God has enough angels. This is not only a stupid thing to say but it’s bad theology.)
    • “At least you have your other parent/sibling/children, grandparent.” (Totally ignores the loss at hand and trivializes the griever’s pain.)
    • “I know _________ is smiling down on us.” (Doesn’t make the loss better at all. The bereaved would rather have the family member smiling here and now.)
    • “Don’t cry, he/she wouldn’t want you to cry.” (Crying is part of grieving, and that’s what needs to happen for healing to come.)
    • “We should be joyful because he/she’s in a better place.” (This may be true, but some people use this filler phrase as crutch to avoid the awkward pain of grief.)
    • “If you think this is bad, I know a family that…” (If you say this to a grieving person Chuck Norris will hunt you down and punish you with a roundhouse kick to the face. Minimalizing someone else’s loss to draw attention to ourselves is one of the most selfish things we can do when caring for a person in grief. Beware, Chuck is watching.)
    • “The Lord never gives us more than we can handle.” (While this is biblically true, that’s not at all how a grieving person feels. The weight of losing a loved one can be devastating.)
  2. Don’t speak more than you listen.[iii] When people grieve they often process through talking. Sharing their feelings, memories of the deceased and talking about how their loved one died are all ways of coping with loss. Let the grieving person talk, and simply be content with being present with them. Many people want to give advice or tell their own personal story of loss as a way to avoid the situation as hand. This however trivializes the loss of the bereaved and comes across as quite tacky.
  3. Don’t judge people based on their reaction to the death.[iv] Grief brings out a litany of emotions. Many people fear death and have never considered their own mortality. This is especially true of teenagers. A teen’s initial way of confronting death may be total avoidance, because they have never faced it before. Some adults might try and pressure a teen to view an open casket, or even eulogize the deceased at the funeral service. The teen may not be emotionally able to handle either of these and should be allowed ample space to process what has happened. Be careful about placing pressure on the student and encourage parents, who are likely grieving also, to give their student room to breathe while dealing with death for the first time. A grieving person may have anxiety about the up-and-down emotions that come with grief, and find that they have little control over outbursts of tears, stabbing memories of when they found their loved one dead, joyful and nostalgic memories of the deceased and even raging anger against God. All of these emotions are natural psychological responses to grief. Not one of them is sinful. We should treat grieving teens, angrief is ok hered their family members with the utmost grace and love, however they mourn.
  4. Don’t rush the student and their family through the grieving process.[v] It takes a LONG time to grieve. The process is not over in a week, a month, six months, or even a year. If a teenager has lost a grandparent, sibling, or parent, it will take considerable time for emotional healing to come. There is no such thing as “getting over” the death of someone you deeply loved. There will always be a hole in the family, and a part of the bereaved will always mourn the loss, especially if it was an untimely or unexpected loss. If the death of the loved one or friend was especially tragic, i.e. suicide, drug overdose, murder, drunk driving accident, etc., the grieving teen may need counseling that is beyond the reasonable scope of care a minister can provide. Youth ministers and pastors should keep a list of local professional counselors and grief support groups handy, and be mindful of when a student or parent is in need of care beyond regular pastoral counseling. When a situation is out of your league, refer the family to a Christian professional in the area who can assist in their care and healing.
  5. Don’t use the death as an opportunity for alter calls, evangelism or an object lesson in Bible study. Ecclesiastes says that there is a time and place for everything. There is a time for pastoral care for grieving families, and there is a time for evangelism. When a family is grieving and emotions are running high, the last thing a minister should do is become an opportunistic soul winner who preys on the emotionally vulnerable. Giving an alter call at youth group on Wednesday night after a student at the local high school is killed in a car accident is not entirely appropriate. In fact, the LEAST pastoral thing you could say in such a situation might go something like this: “Jimmy didn’t know God and therefore is certainly in hell. He would want you accept Jesus as your Lord and Savior so that you don’t burn for all eternity like him. So who wants to give their heart to Jesus and avoid the eternal anguish of face-melting fire? ” Sure, you could get a lot of “decisions” for Christ in said scenario, but have you helped any of the teens actually process grief? Have you been the quite presence of God, who listens rather than feels the need to have all the answers? Do students who come forward in a situation like the one above REALLY surrender to a life of discipleship, or are they signing up for fire insurance? A death in a family or in a school provides excellent opportunities for dialogue and conversation about faith, but ministers should tread carefully and be sensitive to the true needs of grieving students and families.

In the second century a.d., the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius said, “Death smiles at us all, all a man can do is smile back.”[vi] Death is an unavoidable part of living, and teenagers are bound to deal with death sooner or later. Knowing some appropriate, and equally inappropriate, ministerial responses to grief can make all the difference in the quality of pastoral care a person receives while grieving. We hope this list of do’s and don’ts is helpful to you in thinking about how you minister to grieving teens and their families.


[i] Olson, Dr. G. Keith; Counseling Teenagers-The Complete Christian Guide to Understanding and Helping Adolescents, (Group Books, Loveland CO, 1992), pgs. 489-491

[iii] RTS Bereavement Services, Suggestions for Grieving Families Handout

[v] Ibid. missfoundation.org